Rollingist.com.ng

your number 1 healthertainment website

28-years old OAU Graduating medical student breaks record got 12 distinctions
“Fashola, Others Should Be Banned From Using Generators” – Sunday Oduntan
Gunmen abduct a Portuguese in Kogi and kill two policemen
Super eagles coach gernot Rohr wants top-class keeper for World Cup

Latest

     

Thursday, 12 October 2017 11:44

1.8 million IDPs not ready to return home — Report

Written by

 

The Norwegian Refugee Council says 1.8 million persons displaced by Boko Haram insurgency are unwilling to return to their ancestral communities soon in the North-East.

 

The Secretary-General of the Council, Mr Jan Egeland, made this known while presenting the report on situation of Internally Displaced Persons, in Maiduguri.

The report titled “Not Ready to Return” was compiled in collaboration with Danish Refugee Council and Protection Cluster Nigeria.

He said the IDPs were still concerned about security in their communities, reconstructing their destroyed homes and finding means of livelihood when they return home.

Egeland said that 3, 400 households were interviewed during the study at various IDP camps and host communities in 12 local government areas of Borno.

He explained that the study indicated that more than 80 per cent of those interviewed were unwilling to return home in the immediate future due to security concerns.

Egeland said, “The findings of the report are indisputable, when 86 per cent of people tell us they are not ready to go home yet, we must listen, and this cannot fall on deaf ears.

“Today, I met a woman in Monguno , who fled her village two years ago after Boko Haram set it ablaze. She is eager to bring her six children home, but she told me it is too soon, that the armed group are still present.

“People must decide to return of their own free will, coercing communities to move home is a deadly recipe set to worsen the conflict.

 

While the end game is for communities to return home, the unfortunate truth is that pushing people back now will have harmful consequences.

“An overwhelming 85 per cent of people living in formal camps tell us they feel safer there than where they were before, despite the deplorable attacks on camps.”

He added, “Even, if the security situation improves, half of the displaced persons interviewed say their houses were destroyed in the conflict.

“Forty eight per cent of them do not have information about the current state of their homes, indicating that this figure could be much higher.”

Egeland noted that while the military gained successes in the fight against the Boko Haram insurgents, the armed group resorted to attacks on soft targets, including markets and sites sheltering displaced persons.

NAN

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

2 comments

  • Comment Link zvodret iluret Sunday, 08 April 2018 18:03 posted by zvodret iluret

    Good day! This post could not be written any better! Reading this post reminds me of my old room mate! He always kept talking about this. I will forward this write-up to him. Fairly certain he will have a good read. Thank you for sharing!

    Report
  • Comment Link Doretha Monday, 23 October 2017 11:20 posted by Doretha

    I know!? Ꮪtated Larry. ?I bet he likes angels because he has them ɑrօund all of the
    time. PossiЬly he and the angels play family games like we do sometimes.

    Perhaps they play Monopoly.? This made Mommy snigger actually hard.

    Report